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Points of Interest

Use the map at right to get more information on Lewis and Clark museums, scenic overlooks, parks, visitor centers, and more great places to venture off to rounding out your Lewis and Clark experience.

Map Instructions

Click the markers to view points of interest

Idaho Historical Museum

The Idaho Historical Museum, founded in 1907, is Idaho’s largest and most visited museum. Objects from the museum’s collection tell the story of Idaho from prehistoric times through the fur trade, the gold rush, and the pioneer settlement to the present. Interior exhibits show how Idahoans in the late 19th and 20th centuries lived and conducted business. Exhibits about the state’s American Indian, Chinese and Basque populations are also presented. A special Lewis and Clark exhibit (funded by the GTCTC ) is located primarily on the upper floor of the museum. More information below...

Idaho Botanical Garden

The Idaho Botanical Gardens began in 1984 to stimulate an understanding of gardening, horticulture, botany and conservation of natural resources. This development and the education of a vast plant and flower collection take place on 33 leased acres from the State of Idaho, of which 13.5 acres are currently under cultivation. More information below...

Bicentennial Historical Museum

With a focus on Idaho county history and local Nez Perce artifacts, the Bicentennial Historical Museum also has a complete mining exhibit, pioneer life displays, and a mammoth tusk from the 1994 archeological dig at Tolo Lake. The museum features a series of inviting speakers. More information below...

Eimers-Soltman Park Visitor Center

The Eimers-Soltman Park Visitor Center is located at the junction of Pine Street and U.S. Highway 95. This property is owned by the city of Grangeville. At south end of park is a large enclosed exhibit of a Columbia mammoth replica as well as a 12-foot covered kiosk with information about the Northwest Passage Scenic Byway and other local history. More information below...

Visitor Center

The Visitor Center is situated in the downtown core of Kamiah and its architecture integrates with the western/victorian community theme. The Visitor Center is managed by the Chamber of Commerce and shares space with a community grant-writing team and the Lewis County Exhibit Hall. More information below...

Riverfront Park

Riverfront Park, managed by the City of Kamiah, is located on the banks of the Clearwater River adjacent to the highway right-of-way on the southeast side of Kamiah. This site includes a picnic shelter, performance stage, and kiosk, highlighting the Northwest Passage Scenic Byway and other local history. More information below...

Kooskia Crossing Kiosk and Sculptures

A large wood kiosk maintained by the City of Kooskia features interpretive panels and visitor information. These interpretive panels include natural resources, geology, and the Lewis and Clark Expedition. A Northwest Passage Scenic Byway mapboard is at the south end of the site. More information below...

Kooskia City Park

Kooskia City Park is located two-three blocks from downtown Kooskia. The Kooskia Chamber of Commerce obtained grant funding to develop ceramic tile murals depicting plants and animals noted by Lewis and Clark. More information below...

Hells Gate State Park - Lewis and Clark Discovery Center

Completed in 2004 in commemoration of the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, the Lewis and Clark Discovery Center features a visitor center surrounded by a two-acre outdoor interpretive plaza on the banks of the Snake River. More information below...

LCSC Center for Arts and History

The 12,000 square foot building was built in 1884 as the Vollmer Great Bargain Store and is on the National Register of Historic Places. In 1991 First Security Bank of Idaho donated the building to the Lewis-Clark State College Foundation for use as a center for arts and culture. More information below...

Kiwanis Park

The seven-acre Kiwanis Park is situated parallel to Snake River Avenue and the railroad tracks. There is playground equipment, a climbing wall, covered shelter, restrooms, and interpretive panels describing the Lewis and Clark journey. More information below...

Nez Perce County Historical Museum

The Nez Perce County Historical Museum is on the site of Lewiston’s first hotel, the Luna House, built in 1862. During the 1880s, the hotel was used as the county court house until it was torn down in 1890. The property stood empty until 1937 when the current Art Deco building was constructed by the Works Progress Administration for use as government offices. The Historical Society moved into the building in the late 1970s. More information below...

Sacajawea Fountain at Pioneer Park

Pioneer Park is the oldest park in Lewiston. A Bronze sculpture of Sacajawea by J. Shirley Bothum is protected by four bronze coyote statues sitting beneath the bowl. Originally a cemetery until the late 1880s, Pioneer Park is the oldest park in Lewiston. In 1989 a new band shell was built. More information below...

Steelhead Park

Steelhead Park is the home to a popular boat ramp for anglers on the Clearwater River. Lewiston residents enjoy convenient recreational access to the park. The site is managed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Nez Perce County, and the City of Lewiston. More information below...

Tseminicum

The Tseminicum site includes a bronze sculpture entitled “Meeting of the Waters,” interpretive signs, a U.S. Geodetic Survey marker showing the Lewis and Clark Trail, and a small boat ramp. More information below...

Lolo Pass Visitor Center

A rustic log Visitor Center was completed in Lolo Pass in 2003, replacing a small home now used to house seasonal staff. The new visitor center and quarter-mile wetland trail were made possible by multi-agency funding and the Governor’s Trail Committee. More information below...

Appaloosa Museum

The Appaloosa Museum was built on the Idaho-Washington state line property in 1974 and expanded in 1997. The Appaloosa Museum became a non-profit organization established in 1975 to collect, preserve, study, and exhibit objects and information that illustrate the history of the Appaloosa horse. More information below...

Latah County Historical Museum

The McConnell Mansion was built in 1886 by a an Idaho State Senator and Governor from 1887-1893. The house was bequeathed to Latah County as a museum in 1966. More information below...

Canoe Camp

An ancient Nez Perce village site, Canoe Camp, was the location where the Lewis and Clark Expedition encamped and built five dugout canoes in the Fall of 1805 to continue their journey to the Pacific. More information below...

Clearwater Historical Museum

The Clearwater Historical Museum is located in a small historic home in downtown Orofino and is managed by the Clearwater Historical Society. More information below...

Clearwater National Forest Office

The U.S.D.A. Forest Service Clearwater National Forest Supervisor’s Office is located on U.S. Highway 12. Exterior interpretive signs provide background about the Lewis and Clark Expedition along with recreational information on the Clearwater National Forest. More information below...

Dworshak National Fish Hatchery

At Clearwater Crossing, planning in 2002 and funding in 2004 assisted in the development of an interpretive wayside area, with metal sculptures by David Govedare and Keith Powell. The site is located just below the Orofino Bridge at a ford in the Clearwater River, a place used for generations by the Nez Perce people. More information below...

Clearwater Crossing

At Clearwater Crossing, planning in 2002 and funding in 2004 assisted in the development of an interpretive wayside area, with metal sculptures by David Govedare and Keith Powell. The site is located just below the Orofino Bridge at a ford in the Clearwater River, a place used for generations by the Nez Perce people. More information below...

Lemhi County Historical Museum

The Lemhi County Historical Society—through its museum— preserves, restores and presents the history of Lemhi County, Idaho. The museum is staffed by volunteers in the community. More information below...

Sacajawea Center

The Sacajawea Center opened in 2003. It is dedicated to honoring and providing education about Sacajawea, the Agai Dika Lemhi Shoshone people, and the role of Sacajawea in the Corps of Discovery. The Sacajawea Center lies in the heart of Sacajawea’s homeland. More information below...

Nez Perce National Historical Park

The Nez Perce National Historical Park and Visitor Center is managed by the National Park Service and open daily, year-around. It is adjacent to U.S. Highway 95 and offers parking, picnic areas, outdoor lighting and trash receptacles. The visitor center offers restrooms, meeting space, and exhibits, and is staffed year-around. More information below...

Discovery Center

Through the work of the Friends of the Weippe Library and the City of Weippe, the current Weippe Discovery Center property was purchased in January 2002. Multiple grants and donations were received to assist with the purchase and renovation work for the new Weippe Discovery Center. More information below...

NPS Weippe Prairie

The Museum of Winchester History was founded in 1966 when the Craig Mountain Lumber Company who built the third Winchester townsite shut down the mill. Exhibits located in the museum and in the city park include a native plant garden, stories of the millthe Camas Prairie Railroad, mining, and ranching, and a unique Lewis and Clark in Idaho permanent exhibit entitled “Ordway’s Search for Salmon.” More information below...

Museum of Winchester History

The museum was founded in 1966 when the Craig Mountain Lumber Company, who built the third Winchester townsite, shut down the mill. Exhibits located in the museum and in the city park include a native plant garden, the story of the mill, the Camas Prairie Railroad, mining, ranching, and a unique Lewis and Clark in Idaho permanent exhibit entitled “Ordway’s Search for Salmon”. More information below...

Travelers’ Rest State Park

Travelers’ Rest State Park marks the location of a centuries-old campsite used by Lewis and Clark in 1805 and 1806. In 2002, archeologists found evidence of the Corps of Discovery’s latrine and central fire, positioning the park as one of the few sites in the nation with physical confirmation of a Corps of Discovery stay. More information below...

Lost Trail Pass

A rustic log visitor center at Lost Trail Pass was completed in 2001 and is located at the Montana-Idaho border, elevation 7,014 feet. More information below...

Northwest Pass Scenic Byway

In 1803, President Jefferson commissioned Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to find the Northwest Passage – the link between the Missouri River and the Columbia River through the unexplored Rocky Mountains. This 202-mile byway, stretching across north-central Idaho, follows the explorers' route through the ancestral homeland of the Nez Perce people. More information below...

Sacajawea Historic Byway

Sacajawea, an "Agaidika" Shoshone woman born around 1788, is known around the world as a trusted and valuable member of the famed Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery. A lesser-known fact, however, is her historical tie to Idaho's Lemhi Valley where she was born and raised until the age of twelve. More information below...

Salmon River Scenic Byway

The northern end of the Salmon River Scenic Byway begins on the Montana border at the Lost Trail Pass (elevation 6,995 feet). Lewis and Clark came this way in 1805, and the spectacular view from this vantage point has changed little since that famous exploration of the West two centuries ago. More information below...

Lewis and Clark Back Country Byway

Meriwether Lewis and William Clark stood high on a ridge-line that divides continental waters, and began the discovery of the Pacific Northwest. Stands of fir and pine trees, high-mountain meadows and rolling, jade-colored hills look much the same today as when the famous explorers journeyed to the crest of Lemhi Pass in 1805. More information below...

Hells Canyon Scenic Byway

The Hells Canyon Scenic Byway winds its way along the east side of this massive rift that separates Idaho from neighboring Oregon. The surrounding area was the home of Chief Joseph’s band of Nez Perce Indians. Other tribes, including the Shoshone, Bannock, North Paiute and Cayuse Indians, were frequent visitors to the area. Today, walls of the canyon are like a museum, where pictographs and petroglyphs display evidence of the Indians’ early settlements More information below...

Jean Baptiste Charbonneau grave site - Danner, Oregon

Jean Baptiste Charbonneau (02/11/1805-05/16/1866) was the son of the French Canadian Interpreter Toussaint Charbonneau and Sacagawea, the Shoshone Guide of the Lewis and Clark expedition. He was born at Fort Mandan during the expedition’s journey westward. More information below...

Old Chief Joseph’s grave site near Joseph, Oregon: Iwetemlaykin State Heritage Site

The 62-acre parcel of rolling grassland, set amidst the stunning backdrop of the Wallowa Mountains, became a State Heritage Area in 2009. The entire area is part of the ancestral homeland of the Nez Perce Tribe, and is a sacred place to the Nez Perce Tribe, the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation. More information below...

Hospitality of Nez Perce

The "Hospitality of the Nez Perce" is a replica of a statue found on the campus of Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho. The sculpture in artful detail depicts Meriwether Lewis in a three-cornered hat and his colleague William Clark wearing a fur cap. An animated Nez Perce tribal chief, Twisted Hair, motions to the west and a perilous waterway that would transport the explorers to their destination - the Pacific Ocean. More information below...

Hospitality of Nez Perce

The "Hospitality of the Nez Perce" is a replica of a statue found on the campus of Lewis-Clark State College in Lewiston, Idaho. The sculpture in artful detail depicts Meriwether Lewis in a three-cornered hat and his colleague William Clark wearing a fur cap. An animated Nez Perce tribal chief, Twisted Hair, motions to the west and a perilous waterway that would transport the explorers to their destination - the Pacific Ocean. More information below...

Seaman, Lewis’ Newfoundland dog

Dedicated in 2005, Seaman the life- size bronze is located in the 71 acre park at the The Sacajawea Interpretive, Cultural, and Education Center. Artists: Park City, Utah metal sculptor artist Bill Kranstover and Salt Lake City bronze artist, Adrian Prazten. Dogs are allowed on site with a leash. For visitor's who forget, the Center offers the loan of leashes, while on the trails. More information below...


Idaho Historical Museum

The museum, founded in 1907, is Idaho’s largest and most visited museum. Objects from the Museum’s collection tell the story of Idaho from prehistoric times through the fur trade, the gold rush, and pioneer settlement to the present. Interior exhibits show how Idahoans in the late 19th and 20th centuries lived and conducted business. Exhibits about the state’s American Indian, Chinese and Basque populations are also presented. A special Lewis and Clark exhibit, funded by the GTCTC, dominates the upstairs.

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