Idaho. It’s big. It’s uncrowded. There’s more to Idaho than great potatoes. Discover everything you ever wanted to know about Idaho … and some words of wisdom too.

  • The Cataldo mission in North Idaho is the oldest building in the state.
  • Rexburg is home to BYU-Idaho, a 4-year institution associated with the LDS church.
  • Perched at 9,500 feet on Trinity Mountain stands the highest fire lookout in the Boise National Forest.
  • The city of Grace in the Gem Valley is most famous for their certified seed potatoes.
  • The Dworshak Reservoir near Orofino is over 50 miles long. The Dworshak Dam is in Orofino.
  • The economy of Idaho City originally developed around gold mining in the 1860s. It was once the largest town in the Pacific Northwest
  • Bruneau Canyon Overlook offers a view into a 1,200 foot-deep, 800-foot-wide river canyon.
  • On August 8, 1905, Kimberly auctioned city lots for prices ranging from $100 to $750.
  • Idaho's world famous hot springs are located in Lava Hot Springs.
  • Hells Canyon is the deepest river gorge in America, deeper than the Grand Canyon.
  • Shoshone Falls, The Niagara of the West, spills over a 212-foot drop near Twin Falls.
  • Kuna is known as the Gateway City to the Birds of Prey Natural Area.
  • Birds of Prey Wildlife Area is home to the world's most dense population of nesting eagles, hawks, and falcons.
  • Soda Springs boasts the largest man-made geyser in the world.
  • The Lewiston area, at only 734 ft. elevation, is known as Idaho's Banana Belt.
  • Rigby, inventor Philo T. Farnsworth's home town, is known as the birthplace of television.
  • Sun Valley was created in 1936 as America's first destination ski resort.
  • Idaho's best mining era towns include Silver City, Idaho City & Custer.
  • Anderson Ranch Reservoir is known for its blue-ribbon fly-fishing.